snowdeal logo

archives archives

{bio,medical} informatics

Monday, November 11, 2002

bookmark: connotea :: ::digg ::furl ::reddit ::yahoo::

find related articles. powered by google. The Tech Report Measuring Folding@Home's performance impact

"THERE ARE A FEW legitimate reasons not to run Stanford's Folding@Home client. You could be without an always-on Internet connection, or barely able to scrape together enough change to make your next utility bill payment. Heck, you may even think that searching for aliens is a better way to spend your spare CPU cycles, and that's your choice. However, some have raised questions about whether or not the Folding@Home client has an impact on overall system performance, something that could prevent individuals and especially businesses from running the client on their machines."

"Rather than simply trusting that Folding@Home doesn't impact system performance or assuming that running the client will slow things down, we've run the client through a gauntlet of tests to set the record straight, one way or another."

redux [10.23.02]
find related articles. powered by google. News.Com Stanford gives distributed computing an A

"Scientists at Stanford University have demonstrated tangible proof that scientific experiments can be conducted using thousands of low-end PCs wrangled together into loosely linked networks.

A group of chemists, including Stanford assistant professor Vijay Pande, said they successfully predicted the folding rate of a protein using calculations worked out on a so-called distributed computing network. Their research, conducted last year, was published this week in the science journal Nature."

redux [04.04.01]
find related articles. powered by google. BioMedNet Intel supports online protein project
[requires 'free' registration]

"Intel is providing equipment and software downloads for a project in which volunteers are donating spare home computer cycles to a Stanford University project studying the protein-folding process. The project, Folding@Home, was the first to model successfully a complete protein fold - a task not even achieved by supercomputers."

""We want to increase the value of the PC," said Scott Griffin, Intel's program manager. "The PC is there when people aren't at it, like when they are in meetings. A great thing about this is you get every day users involved in research that they care about. Not only do they get to help out, but they get to help cure these terrible diseases.""

redux [09.23.01]
find related articles. powered by google. Wired News The Little Screensaver That Could

"IBM is spending $100 million building the world's fastest supercomputer to do cutting-edge medical research, but a distributed computing effort running on ordinary PCs may have beaten Big Blue to the punch.

IBM's proposed Blue Gene , a massively parallel supercomputer, in hopes to help diagnose and treat disease by simulating the ultra-complex process of protein folding.

"But Folding@Home , a modest distributed computing project run by Dr. Vijay Pande and a group of graduate students at Stanford University, has already managed to simulate how proteins self-assemble, something that computers, until now, have not been able to do."

[ rhetoric ]

Bioinformatics will be at the core of biology in the 21st century. In fields ranging from structural biology to genomics to biomedical imaging, ready access to data and analytical tools are fundamentally changing the way investigators in the life sciences conduct research and approach problems. Complex, computationally intensive biological problems are now being addressed and promise to significantly advance our understanding of biology and medicine. No biological discipline will be unaffected by these technological breakthroughs.


[ search ]

[ outbound ]

biospace / genomeweb / bio-it world / scitechdaily / biomedcentral / the panda's thumb / / nodalpoint / flags and lollipops / on genetics / a bioinformatics blog / andrew dalke / the struggling grad student / in the pipeline / gene expression / free association / pharyngula / the personal genome / genetics and public health blog / the medical informatics weblog / linuxmednews / nanodot / complexity digest /

eyeforpharma /

nsu / nyt science / bbc scitech / newshub / biology news net /

informatics review / stanford / bmj info in practice / bmj info in practice /

[ schwag ]

look snazzy and support the site at the same time by buying some snowdeal schwag !

[ et cetera ]

valid xhtml 1.0?

This site designed by
Eric C. Snowdeal III .
© 2000-2005